all posts, eczema, miscellaneous, nutrition

what on earth is seed cycling?

Today’s post may feel a bit out there, but that’s why it’s also nestled under my “miscellaneous” category. So, having absolved myself of all guilt for anyone who misinterprets this post as hard fact, I begin.

I recently saw the term ‘seed cycling’ used on social media and became intrigued as to one, what it meant, and two, what benefit it had (if any).

A quick Google search led me to both answers. Seed cycling is somewhat literally what it sounds like (although my first guess as it was 4am as I wrote this, involved interpreting cycling as bicycling). You cycle between seeds in your diet, consuming specific ones at specific types during your menstrual cycle (and supposedly it can be use for peri-menopausal and post-menopausal women as well).

Anyway, the theory is that a menstrual cycle is most naturally working if it is within the 28-day cycle, and anything else indicates some sort of imbalance of estrogen. The seeds chosen during the two phases of the menstrual cycle (when estrogen is decreasing and when it is increasing) are chosen specifically to help balance out the estrogen in each phase to allow the person to resume the natural cycle duration.

At this point you may be wondering why am I posting about this on my eczema blog? Well, you may recall from my post on pregnancy, that one of the factors believed to provoke eczema in pregnant women is the surge of estrogen. So my hypothesis is that if one’s cycle is off, and they experience larger ranges of estrogen surges during phases of their cycle, perhaps that would increase the intensity of an eczema flare.

Here’s a quick overview about the menstrual cycle (I previously worked as a women’s health consultant, so I both enjoy this kind of knowledge and could use the refresher myself). We have 4 phases: menstruation, the follicular phase, ovulation, and then the luteal phase.

  • MENSTRUATION – This is the phase in which the lining of the uterus (or the endometrium), which has thickened over the month, comes off and there is bleeding from the vagina.
  • FOLLICULAR PHASE – This phase starts on the first day of menstruation. The pituitary glands, triggered by the hypothalamus, release follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and FSH in turn causes the ovaries to release a few follicles, each of which has an egg. One of these follicles’ eggs will start to mature, while the others die (around day 10). The uterine lining starts to thicken during this phase too due to follicular stimulation. The follicular growth also causes a surge in estrogen, which the body compensates for by the hypothalamus releasing gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), which gets the pituitary gland to release lutenizing hormome (LH) and FSH.
  • OVULATION – During this phase, the high levels of LH triggers the release of the mature egg from the ovaries in two days. The egg is propelled by little hair-like structures through the fallopian tube into the uterus. Once there, it can survive for only about 24 hours. During this process, the egg has “hatched” out of the follicle, and the follicular remnant that gets dragged along outside the egg becomes the corpus luteum. The corpus luteum releases progesterone and a little estrogen, a mixture that helps keep the uterine lining thickened.
  • LUTEAL PHASE – During this phase the corpus luteum releases progesterone and a little estrogen, a mixture that helps keep the uterine lining thickened. When no pregnancy occurs, the corpus luteum falls off and dies (around day 22), causing a drop in progesterone. The progesterone drop triggers the uterine lining to fall off (aka menstruation), hence the cycle repeats.

So how does one do this seed cycling, you ask? Well, during the follicular phase (day 1 when you start to bleed to day 14) you take a daily dose of 1 tablespoon of ground flax/pumpkin/chia seeds. From days 15-28 you take a daily dose of tablespoon of ground sunflower/sesame seeds. That’s all there is to it.

But why is this supposed to work? I couldn’t find any rigorous studies on seed cycling, but came upon a blog post written by a naturopathic doctor (Dr. Lindsey Jesswein). She explains that the seed hulls have chemicals called lignans, which help “modulate hormone pathways”, and the seed oils (made of omega fatty acids) help “provide the building blocks for steroid hormone synthesis”. Jesswein then describes each seed (minus chia) a bit more by what they provide:

  • Flax – vitamin B, manganese,  and magnesium
  • Pumpkin – iron, magnesium phosphorous, zinc
  • Sesame – vitamin E, vitamin B1, manganese, irin, magnesium, copper, sesamin
  • Sunflower – vitmin E, linoleic acid, magnesium, potassium, zinc, calcium

The Herbal Academy (which was how I came to Dr. Jesswein blog post) goes into a bit more detail about the various benefits of each of these seeds and provided studies, but noted that the information was on individual seeds and not their impact with seed cycling.

A few of the studies they included (and some additional ones I found) found that:

Overall the evidence of large changes for the menstrual cycle is not huge, but at the same time, it generally doesn’t hurt to consume seeds in one’s diet so it may be worth trying if you want to play around with your nutrition (though always seek advice from a medical professional first, especially if you have a specific condition you are trying to treat!).

I’m curious to apply seed to myself so I might give it a trial for a few months and report back. Maybe. I’m also incredibly fickle, so probably not. I generally eat flax anyway with breakfast and the like, but I wouldn’t be able to notice if there were any changes because I’m still breastfeeding and thus not getting my period anyway.

Also I do understand that engaging in many different eczema projects simultaneously results in confounding the data as to which project individually helps my eczema, but it is my belief that eczema cannot be managed by just one miracle solution (though diet is a huge one) and so enacting multiple positive changes and approaches, so long as they are sustainable to myself lifestyle, I view as being the most maximally beneficial.

 

REFERENCES

Gossell-Williams, M., Hyde, C., Hunter, T., Simms-Stewart, D,. Fletcher, H., McGrowder, D., Walters, C.A. (2011). Improvement in HDL cholesterol in postmenopausal women supplemented with pumpkin seed oil: pilot study. Climacteric. 2011 Oct;14(5):558-64.

Hall, Annie. “Seed Cycling for Hormonal Balance.” Herbal Academy, https://theherbalacademy.com/seed-cycling-for-hormonal-balance/. Accessed 22 Oct 2018.

“Menstrual Cycle.” Better Health Channel, https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/menstrual-cycle. Accessed 24 Oct 2018.

Phipps WR, Martini MC, Lampe JW, Slavin, JL, Kurzer MS. (1993). Effect of flax seed ingestion on the menstrual cycle. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. 1993 Nov;77(5):1215 – 1219.

Somwanshi SB, Gaikwad VM, Dhamak KB, Gaware VM. Women’s Health Issue: A Brief Overview on Irregular Menstruation. IJNRD. 2017 May;7(5):2456-4184.

Troina AA, Figueiredo MS, Moura EG, Boaventura GT, Soares LL, Cardozo LFMF, Oliveira E, Lisboa PC, Passos MARF, Passos MCF. Maternal flaxseed diet during lactation alters milk composition and programs the offspring body composition, lipid profile and sexual function. Food and Chemical Toxicology, 2010 Fed;48(2):697-703.

Zaineddin AK, Buck K, Vrieling A, Heinz J., Flesch-Janys D, Linseisen, J, Chang-Claude J. (2012). The association between dietary lignans, phytoestrogen-rich foods, and fiber intake and postmenopausal breast cancer risk: a German case-control study. Nutrition and Cancer. 2012;64(5):652-65.

all posts, eczema

where’s my glow? (pregnancy with eczema)

Today I decided to dig a bit more into the world of eczema for us pregnant folk.

I started by watching a podcast done by Abby Lai (of Prime Physique Nutrition) in which she talked with Dr. Peter Lio (he’s done a few National Eczema Association webinars). Link to Abby’s podcast is here.

The major points were:

  • It’s not really understood why but about 1/2 of pregnant women have worsened symptoms and 1/2 have bettered symptoms. Dr. Lio likened it to how some women get nausea during pregnancy.
  • You can have a flare in one pregnancy, but not in the next. Also you can have changes in skin between trimesters.
  • Dr. Lio mentioned a few itching conditions that can occur during pregnancy such as cholestasis (when liver and gall bladder slow down their bile flow which causes a terrible itch), atopic eruption of pregnancy, PUPPP (or pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy which usually occurs during the 3rd trimester).

He and Abby then talked about treatments used during pregnancy including such as:

  • how topical steroids are okay but not most potent ones. The goal is to keep body surface area that you apply the topical steroids to relatively low (so not WHOLE body), because topical steroids go in blood if they are used long enough or over large surface areas.
  • light/phototherapy
  • Benadryl and other anti-histamines
  • wet wraps, icing, moisturizers (see my post on products I’ve tried here)
  • anti-itch creams in small amounts (such as camphor and menthol)
  • natural oils like coconut and sunflower seed oil (if not allergic)
  • dilute bleach baths (he also mentioned a recent paper shows it’s anti-inflammatory and anti-itch directly, as well as being antibacterial)
  • topical vitamin B 12 (water soluble) – pink magic

The takeaway advice he gave was don’t be afraid to use medicine so long as you have a doctor helping you.

I was having trouble finding full access studies but I did stumble across a PDF from the National Eczema Association about getting pregnancy, skin tips during pregnancy, and after pregnancy advice. It also talked about the likelihood of the baby getting eczema and things to hopefully prevent it. The same PDF also mentioned that avoiding soap can also help decrease the disruption to the skin barrier (which is not something I’ve heard said often; normally it was just to not use antibacterial soap specifically because the bacteria can adapt over time and we’ll be stuck with pathogens that can’t be killed as easily).

In regards to when the mothers are postpartum, such as how there can be challenges with breastfeeding if the mother develops eczema around the area. In that case, the study said low to moderate potency topical steroids can be used so long as they are washed off before the next breastfeeding.

Updated: The National Eczema Association posted a new article May 2018 called Oh baby! Eczema from pregnancy to menopause that goes into more detail about why women may experience more incidences of eczema during pregnancy. It mentions how a researcher at the University of California-San Francisco (Dr. Jenny Murase) found that when a woman is pregnant, her body shifts from Th1-dominant to Th2-dominant immunity in order to protect the fetus (because Th1 attacks foreign material that get into our cells, aka it would attack the fetus since they have half of the father’s cells). Th2-dominant immunity means the mom’s body attacks allergens and whatnot that are flowing around outside her cells, protecting the fetus, but not helping when it comes to eczema. The blog post said that the shift from Th1 to Th2 is driven by the surge of estrogen. Perhaps that is also why women generally have higher rates of eczema than men? Unfortunately I couldn’t find the study that the NEA article cited so I can’t follow up with more, though I did find an abstract from Dr. Murase et al, that mentioned how psoriasis tends to improve during pregnancy correlating with those higher estrogen levels… so maybe one of the immunity-linked causes of eczema and psoriasis are opposite in origin?

My personal experience with being pregnant while having eczema has been that I have to be more mindful about how I treat my eczema relative to general lifestyle changes too. For example, no longer can I go and drink tons of kombucha (due to varying alcohol content and the light risk of bacteria), enjoy whatever random herbs I feel will help me heal, go jump into a hot yoga class unprepared (because getting dizzy affects another being besides myself), eat whatever fish I want whenever (I am a tuna fan and enjoy sushi when not pregnant), run and jump into a hot springs all willy nilly, etc. I have to be more mindful about sharing my body and not just jumping into whatever new protocol or thing I want to try out to help my skin. I can’t decide to just go on a particularly aggressive dietary change that involves caloric restrictions or drastic nutritional adjustments.

That being said, being pregnant has also had a lot of changes that might be helping my skin. In my first trimester I was very sugar and meat adverse, so I ended up eating a lot more veggies. When I wrote this piece in my third trimester I tended to crave veggies as a way to keep my guts feeling good, and to keep indigestion at bay. I also ate smaller meals more frequently, and didn’t really accidentally binge eat big meals mindlessly, which was great because it meant that my body wasn’t overtaxed in digestion (which meant more time to heal the skin!). Pregnancy had me feeling a bit more tired (and much like with a flare, also avoiding high intensity activities), so I tended to stick to lower impact, longer duration activities like going for walks for miles or remembering to get in 100 modified push-ups a day.

Anyway, I’ll stop there and leave you with a current photo of me when I wrote this post. I was about 31 weeks pregnant now and you can see my arms and hands in particular were especially topically-challenged.

Screen Shot 2018-04-23 at 11.11.01 AM.png

 

REFERENCES

Crane, Margaret W. Oh, baby! Eczema from pregnancy to menopause. National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/oh-baby-eczema/. Accessed 30 Apr 2018.

Lawton, Sandra. “Pregnancy and eczema”. Exchange, https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=20&ved=0ahUKEwj3hO2D-9jaAhWmc98KHRNhAusQFgjGATAT&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.eczema.org%2Fdocuments%2F711&usg=AOvVaw2fS6lrX7fvyosOV1imHE4p. Accessed 30 Apr 2018.

Murase JE, Chan KK, Garite TJ, Cooper DM, Weinstein GD. Hormonal effect on psoriasis in pregnancy and post partum. Arch Dermatol. 2015 May;141(5):601-606.

Silverberg JI, Hanifin JM. Adult eczema prevalence and associations with asthma and other health demographic factors: a US population-based study. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Nov;132(5):1132-1138.