all posts, community, eczema, mental health, miscellaneous, mortality, parentings/things about baby and kids, women's health

old plans meet new horizons (aka what I do when the little one sleeps)

woman carrying baby near green trees
Photo by Shari Murphy on Pexels.com

In the past, I may have mentioned how I am obsessed with the fourth trimester and all things postpartum, or how when I was in my physical therapy doctorate program, I was interested in going into a women’s health specialty.

After I left the program, I searched for ways to slowly transition into the women’s health field from a different angle. And so from April through October 2018, I worked as a women’s health information specialist for Dr. Brianne Grogan, a women’s health PT and health and wellness coach and the creator of FemFusion Fitness. It was one of those random connections that seems fortuitous- in fact I had contacted her years ago after reading her book (way before I even had applied to PT schools) because I was interested in learning more about women’s health.

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My job for her entailed handling email inquiries from women trying to understand

  • what was going on with their bodies
  • what content Bri had out, and
  • who they should see (doctors, PTs, etc).

I also worked on various projects like helping make distributable content for bone building exercises, and I collected research for her new topics. On occasion I did some help with audience outreach to get her free content out into the world.

In time though we amicably went our separate ways. She moved on to focus more on holistic health practices and less on women’s health physical therapy and rehabilitation specifically, and so I continued on in my own direction, which at the time mostly included prepping for my baby’s arrival into the world. Working for Bri was an awesome opportunity because not only is she the nicest, but I got to brush the cobwebs out of my brain about women’s health rehabilitation and really delve into the subject (if you haven’t checked it out already, her youtube is full of free videos of explanations and exercises that cover a gambit of topics like prolapse, diastasis recti, pelvic pain, etc. Check it out here).

Afterward having my baby, I had not lost the love for the fascinating field of women’s health, I merely needed time to rethink how I could enter the world as a professional, no longer coming from the physical therapy realm.

I had been contemplating the idea of becoming a postpartum doula for a long time, and I finally realized what I was missing in that thought process. My objective couldn’t be simply to become a traditional postpartum doula because I would always have to explain about my skin condition, that I’m not contagious, what that means for my services, and work around my own flares and down time. But in reality when I was thinking about my own limitations, I should have been thinking about who could relate to having them. This led me to thinking about those expecting, new, or seasoned moms that have to live with eczema or other chronic conditions (shoutout to all the spoonies out there!) while growing/raising a babe or two (or three or more), and what their needs might be.

It’s not uncommon for people with chronic illnesses to have higher rates of depression, and it’s not uncommon for moms to suffer from postpartum depression, so what about those unlucky ladies that get hit with both? How do they find a support system that bridges both gaps, knowing that some of their depression comes from living with an incurable condition, and the other from being steamrolled with new hormones and emotions as a new life blends into theirs? That is a demographic I feel has not been studied or served enough. And so, I have begun to slowly pull my own experiences (both personal and professional) to better understand and then serve this group. I have been working on merging three of my interests to accomplish this:

  1. postpartum education (e.g my postpartum doula course and my position researching and writing postpartum mental health pieces),
  2. community engagement projects (two in the works: one to help educate mamas of color who may face discrimination from the medical/healthcare world or not have access to it at all, and one about how to train churches to better serve new moms in their area), and
  3. volunteering more with the National Eczema Association. This helps me to be in the know about what policies are being created (or challenged), as well as what new treatments or practices are out.

I use these three directions to help understand my own struggles, as well as figure out how I might work to help mothers out there like me (or other parents/caregivers!). It also gives me more reasons to continually I brush up on healthcare policies, systemic support options, familial/community building techniques, measurable outcome scales, all manner of recent research and studies, etc, which I tend to like to peruse anyway.

I have also been exploring the other side of my interests- traditions and cultures around death. Soon I will be taking Alua Arthur’s End of Life training and learn how to best serve individuals and their families around their time of dying. I think it’s such a taboo thing that we really need to talk about more. The amount of people with traumatizing stories and feelings of regret around their loved ones times of dying is astounding, and historically many cultures prevented this by being present and accepting death as nature, not some scary thing never to be spoken about. As Alua says “talking about sex won’t make you pregnant. Talking about death won’t make you dead.”

I think talking about mortality brings up some important conversations (even just with oneself) about the relative value of our day to day decisions. Interestingly enough, many of my postpartum books now overlap with my study of death. I recently read Overwhelmed: Work, Love, and Play When No One Has the Time by Briget Schulte and it had multiple mentions of how mortality was regarded over the years, and how that was reflected in how we approach our day to day lives, including our aggressive work-above-all work culture today. The logic is, if you think about your mortality to a normal moderate amount, you make choices that are more centered around your mortality. We aren’t talking about the “YOLO” ideology, but rather decisions such as ‘maybe you don’t need to take that extra late business call that’s not really mission critical in lieu of spending time with your loved ones’, and that kind of logic.

Oh that reminds me- I did recently finish a class through Mothering Arts about how to create a community supported postpartum space that I really enjoyed. It offered lots of insight in how to welcome in new mamas as well as community “grannies” and draw-in local professional women to offer their expertise to the moms. My only rub is that I want to create a larger scale space than that demographic (though not necessarily a large number of people at one time). I want to create a space (maybe a physical community shop) that welcomes everyone is to have discussions, seek community, find aid… almost something that mixes time banks, death cafes, postpartum meet-ups, with a part-time bartering system, all wrapped into a welcoming looking shop. I get inspired by places like HausWitch though my target audience is slightly different.

Obviously my long term goals are still being constructed, but I think one day I would like to own this type of shop with my sister (who is paving her career in graphic design/UX and my best friend (who is a social worker), offering classes and discussions, innovative tech, and community services centered around the biggest times of change (birth/postpartum, and death). We also want to raise families together so working together would give us the time and space to figure out how to make it all work. ❤

On the book front, I’m currently reading Witches of America by Alex Mar which I’m finding so inspiring. It’s not that I want to be a witch per se, but I love learning about different routes of beliefs and what draws people to them, and Mar explores this topic so well.

Anyway, as the colder months approach, I’m in the hibernation phase of life again. Lots of reading, snuggles with the little one, obsessions with soups, teas, and decaf lattes. My family and I are moving soon, which is a new adventure on its own because we are finally leaving Massachusetts, but is a lot of mental overload on how to move across multiple states (any advice is welcome). The move might be hugely impactful on my skin too because I think my condition gets worse in the fall due to a mold allergy (and fall here is pretty moldy!). I’m actually friggin’ psyched to be moving- but more on that another day.

 

all posts, community, eczema, miscellaneous, women's health

girl power! on collectives and community (and witches!)

photo of multicolored abstract painting
Photo by Free Creative Stuff on Pexels.com

Eczema is a devilish disease that is best thwarted mentally (in my case) by keeping myself busy reading, researching, and daydreaming. The strongest distraction as of late has been collectives. I have always had an affinity for all sorts of collectives because I think that when the project comes together from all that cooperation, it showcases the greatness of an amalgam of multiple minds. As such I have become more aware of collective collaborations over the years, especially when it comes to the arts. As I am often entangled in women’s health, below are a few of the more recent finds that are all women/all girl collective efforts.

The Secret Love of Geek Girls is an anthology created by Hope Nicholson and other artists, of prose and comic forms, which encompasses various topics such as divorce, coming out, asexuality, young love, and other aspects all from the lenses of women who identify and/or embody the idea of a geek. I absolutely loved it. It’s an anthology I have purchased to randomly flip open pages to read when I’m feeling a certain kind of way. Also I think it would be an awesome idea to create an eczema anthology one day, to share the experiences and feelings and worlds of those afflicted.

Girls Drawin’ Girls Tarot Deck  is a beautiful tarot deck done by the Girls Drawin’ Girls, a group formed by Melody Simpsons (who worked on the Simpsons). The group was formed to allow women a space to compete in a traditionally male-dominated industry. Speaking of tarot, I’ve gotten very interested in it lately. Not only does it gave a strong history of feminine mysticism but some people in the medical and health professional fields have been starting to use it as a therapeutic device. Jessica Dore uses tarot in her clinical work as she becomes a social worker, and Dr. Art Rosengarten, a clinical therapist, uses tarot for psychotherapy. There are a few older studies (like this one from the 90s) about tarot used for therapy, and the general impression I got is that due to the symbolism, tarot helps to give the clients a more visual way to process out their thoughts and bring forth aspects that are on their subconscious. In my head, if nothing else I see it as being a therapeutic tool, much like the Rorschach (ink blot) test but more multifaceted, and I would love to see more studies done on it. I also personally want to learn how to do tarot readings for the storytelling aspect, but if it makes me subsequently be more in the moment, reflexive, or mindful (or if nothing else, distracted from my itches), I’m not complaining.

And since we’ve delved into tarot, and are thus already over the line and into mysticism, we must then talk about witches. The history of witches in America (as I understand it to be from listening to the tours in Salem and from this Smithsonian article), is mostly a tale of fear mongering. It started in Salem, Massachusetts (at the time the town of Danvers was also a part of Salem). A young girl and her cousin (Elizabeth and Abigail), whose slave (Tituba) used to tell them stories to amuse her and her friends, supposedly faked going into a possessed fits, their friends followed, and then religious men got involved who started calling out all witches to be persecuted (usually with the sentence of being jailed forever). A witch ended up encompassing any wayward woman (or sometimes man), such as one who didn’t behave as expected, who was promiscuous, who spoke her mind with the candor of a man,  who dabbled in the art of herbal healing, etc, and evidence for arrest included visions for a time. The tension was ramped up because of various families in towns competing for resources and believing the high tensions to be the result of devilry (witches were thought to commune with the devil). I’ve heard it thought that there may have also been competition for tourism and so slandering the other parts of Salem (e.g. Salem Village versus Salem Town) with the threat of witchcraft was a surefire way to insure more money into your own town (but I’m not sure this is true- I just heard it by word of mouth). The culmination of events led to the infamous Salem Witch Trials, with 200 accused, and the death of 20 people (not including those who died in jail).

Today there is more of a new era of witch culture in America. Well there are two blurred and overlapping lines of “witches”. There are the herbalists and healers who had had a bad rap in the past for practicing medicine and healing outside of the realm of religion/formal hospital training, and then there are the new age witches (which can also include herbalists and healers). As I live very close to Salem today and Vermont/Maine, I do get glimpses of both, but only limitedly. A lot of Salem is rampant tourism like the Harry Potter store Wynott’s Wands (though their wares are beautiful and I found out that their wands sell well as batons for conductors, which is really cool).

One example of the new age of witches is HausWitch, the store creation of Erica Feldmann who describes it as “a modern metaphysical lifestyle brand and shop” where they sell “witchy” wares made by independent makers, including a lot of self care body products, journals, courses (like tarot readings and seasonally-focused events), etc. The most interesting aspect of HausWitch and stores like it are the modernization of witchcraft as an inclusive movement. HausWitch for example, works to create community and thus holds many different events and healing practices and activism discussion among other activities to foster connections. Traditionally, a bunch of witches together in a group was called a coven, and was seen and portrayed as a dangerously bad thing, but in seeing covens today, they are essentially just another form of community with the commonality, instead of being location, sparking the starting connection.

Personally, as a person who is always trying to find ways to foster community wherever I go, I think the whole new resurgence of witchcraft is pretty cool, and I’m excited to learn more about it and see where else in the country it’s happening. I am particularly biased because I have always loved herbalism and since my eczema has gotten crazy, self care, and so any movements that entails taking care of yourself and immersing yourself in a community that is seasonally-inclined, is my cup of tea.

 

REFERENCES

Blumberg, Jess. “A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials: One town’s strange journey from paranoia to pardon.” Smithsonian.com, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/a-brief-history-of-the-salem-witch-trials-175162489/. Accessed 17 Sept 2018.

Dore, Jessica. “Tarot + Psychology: An Interview with Dr. Art Rosengarten.” Jessica Dore, https://www.jessicadore.com/tarot-psychology-interview-dr-art-rosengarten/. Accessed 17 Sept 2018.

Heaney, Katie. “Does Your Therapy Need More Tarot?” The Cut, https://www.thecut.com/2018/07/does-your-therapy-need-more-tarot.html. Accessed 17 Sept 2018.

Semetsky, Inna. Integrating Tarot readings into counselling and psychology. Spirtuality and Health International. 2005;6(2).